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ZuumSocial Releases Facebook Leaderboard – Most Engaged #CPG Brands on FB

Last month Zuum announced it will begin monthly ranking of the 25 most engaging brands on Facebook.  The rankings are limited to the top brands operating in the U.S.  This is how they summarized their criteria for selection:

The goal of this is to capture the Facebook content and community traits of the top brands operating in the US. So we’ve put several constraints on which brands are selected. Brands must be operating in the US, we’ll use the US page unless there’s only a global page, brands must be consumer products vs B2B, and we’re excluding technology and entertainment brands, as our goal is to better understand how typical consumer products work on social media, and both of those categories tend to skew towards extremely high engagement due to the product type.

For July and August Monster Energy Drinks captured the top.  This month Zuum has released the rankings for a specific category CPG Dips and Dressings.  Here is the lead-in to their rankings:

CPG is a very broad business category, with sub-categories like soft drinks having brands with some of the larger social media fan counts anywhere. In our July ranking of the 25 most engaging brands on Facebook, the three top brands are CPG.

Of course, the CPG umbrella includes many smaller brands, with more niche or regional appeal. One subcategory in particular is dips and dressings. Below is the Facebook Leaderboard for some of the top dips and spreads brands in the US for the month of July.

You can see that the fan counts, while not what you’ll see from Pepsi or Coke, are still substantial. Posting volume is a little light in this category, with even the top brand, Sabra, only posting about 1 time per day.

Once the novelty of these new rankings are gone what value does this have to a CPG category manager or sales analyst?  “Well – Nancy . . .” – if your analytics cannot lay this new, unstructured data alongside your retailer supplied POS and inventory data – there is no value outside of water cooler talk.

This is one of the major limitations of rigid, outdated, DSRs built using data warehouse technology.  Rigid in the sense that to add new data feeds takes months – sometimes years.  The loading of the data – including current feeds – is long and cumbersome.  From a technological point-of-view these simply will break under the weight of increasing amount and type of data.

If you want to use these new – and exciting – data points (social media, weather, and et. al.) to draw insights and correlations to sales – then the only technology that can pull this off – today – is Big Data.

That’s what the buzz is about.  Will your brand be buzzing going forward?

We are Vortisieze.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on your BI strategy.

 

Sources:

Facebook July Leaderboard for CPG Dips and Dressings

http://blogs.imediaconnection.com/blog/2015/08/17/facebook-july-leaderboard-for-cpg-dips-and-dressings/

 

Ranking 25 of the most engaging brands on Facebook

http://zuumsocial.com/ranking-25-of-the-most-engaging-brands-on-facebook/

 

July Ranking of 25 Most Engaging Brands on Facebook

http://zuumsocial.com/july-ranking-of-25-most-engaging-brands-on-facebook/

 

#CPG

#Business Intelligence

#BigData

#AnalyticsInRetail

NYC Shoppers (Still) Want Walmart

This very interesting article on Forbes.com yesterday reminds those of us who live and work in the shadow of the Walmart Home Office that there are areas where there is no Walmart store.

New York City is one such area – no Walmart exists within the five boroughs.  The mayor and most of the city council oppose Walmart entering NYC.

As the article points out – “25 percent of respondents go to the suburbs to shop Walmart stores. And it is obvious that many New Yorkers go to the burbs to shop other big box stores, discounters and outlet malls.”

The arguments against Walmart remain the same – and each one is Luddite in nature.

  • Walmart pays low wages. There is no denying that Walmart pay and benefits are modest by comparison, especially at the part-time and entry levels.  However, for people who just want jobs Walmart is the perfect place to start and learn retail.  And, Walmart hires from the communities around its stores.  Since the retailer appeals to middle to low income shoppers this means that those who need opportunity the most can find it – with the chance to move up the ladder in position and pay.  Additionally, those opposed to Walmart based on pay fail to look at the comparison of revenue per associate with other “high paying” companies – Walmart is at the low end of that scale.  And the margin of profit is much lower for Walmart, compared to other Fortune 500 companies, so there is a smaller pie to slice.  However, lower margins means lower prices – great for the consumers.
  • Walmart is anti-union. Walmart has worked actively against unionization of its workforce throughout its history.  Advocates of unions fail to demonstrate the benefit to their workforce.  By artificially raising the cost of labor unions in private industry have reduced available jobs so fewer people are working.  When the best hand-out is a hand-up through job opportunities how is limiting the number of jobs available helping the unemployed find skill training through work?
  • Walmart is hurting small, local businesses. On April 1, 1975 Walmart store #85 opened in my hometown.  Before then, only small, family-owned stores were available for items like hardware and clothing.  My mother drove my sister and I over 30 miles to the state capitol to shop at the large retail chains (primarily JCPenny for school clothes since her first job was as a clerk at JCP).  The local department store simply charged prices that were too high for my budget-minded parents.  Yes – after Walmart opened those businesses lost revenue and, over time, most eventually went out business.  What the critics fail to acknowledge is that Walmart has always offered lower prices for the budget minded.  As to the jobs lost through the shutdown of small, local business – Walmart more than made up for that by hiring more people than what was lost – and the part-timer had greater flexibility in the hours worked – the full-timer has opportunity for advancement that were not available through family-owned stores.  When was the last time a store owner promoted a talented, ambitious person over his son?

I have never understood the resistance to a retailer like Walmart, which achieved its success through competing for the hearts, minds and wallets of the consumer.  And it must still compete today or go the way of Sears.  The consumer is always the winner and should always foremost in the minds of the political elite.

Should these elitists have their way and force Walmart to change its model in any or all the points above then the inevitable result will be higher prices to the consumer.  Essentially – a hidden tax to protect constituent groups these politicians depend on for power.

Why is this important to category managers and sales analysts?  When the retailer you partner with is arbitrarily blocked from entering certain “political zones” you have fewer outlets through which to efficiently distribute your product.

The bottom line is – your brand loses – the retailer loses – and most importantly – the consumer loses through higher prices and fewer choices.

And that’s just my opinion.

 

Source:  NYC Shoppers (Still) Want Walmart

#Retailing

#Walmart

#CategoryManagement

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Top 3 Nuggets Buried In Your Retail Transaction Data

  1. What is selling – and where:  With POS data available daily waiting once a week to adjust store inventory is over.  Immediate shelf adjustments puts the right product in the right place.
  2. Customer buying patterns:  Patterns emerge from data about customer behavior and CPG companies can meet consumer needs before the consumer is aware of those needs.
  3. Is your data clean?:  Pulling in structured data into rigidly structured DSR data warehouses is fairly straight forward.  The retailer and CPG firm share and use the same definition for key retail elements.  But as CPG adopts big data technology that allows ad hoc, sometimes unstructured data to become part of the analytics pool, CPG may find that the category managers and home office are using different definitions for sale, customer, etc.  With flexibility comes responsibility – the responsibility of creating a single definition for common retail elements.  Big data allows CPG the flexibility to do this.

To summarize – many nuggets can be mined from the transactional data received from the retailer.  But it is increasingly critical that this data is brought in and analyzed much faster than before.  Big, rigid data warehouses bog down loading increasing volumes of data making it more difficult for CPG category managers, supply chain and manufacturing to respond quickly to changing consumer buying behavior.  Big data, by design, can reduce this process from many hours to mere minutes.

To understand how fast analytical insights can help you gain that competitive advantage for your brand contact us today for a complementary consultation.  (We won’t tell your IT director if you don’t.)

 

 

Source:  Consumer-packaged goods sector digs into transaction data

#CPG

#CPGMarketing

#CPGCategoryManagement

#CPGSupplyChain

 

 

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How GoPro Is Using #BigDataAnalytics in The #CloudComputing to Kick Everyone Else’s Butt

We run around talking about how important analytics is and yet there are few really compelling examples of how well it is working. Part of this is because the vast majority of implementations are still in process and haven’t gotten to value yet, part is because they were done wrong and value wasn’t found, and part because firms don’t like sharing with competitors how they are kicking those competitor’s butts.

GoPro, however, is the perfect example of how analytics are being used competitively to out-execute much larger companies like Sony.

So starts the article on TechSpective.net published on August 3, 2015.  This article is a must read on how to use big data and analytics to out maneuver your competitor.  The challenge is adapting the technology to brick and mortar retail.

Interestingly GoPro implemented the same strategy that we at Vortisieze execute every day.  Data in the cloud, strong big data technology and a top-notch analytics engine.  Like GoPro, Vortisieze partners with Cloudera.  To round it out though, Vortisieze maintains its own data cloud and leverages MicroStrategy (et al.) for the analytics engine.

Contact us today for your complimentary BI consultation.

 

Source: How GoPro is using Amazon, BMC, and Cloudera to kick everyone else’s butt

#Cloudera
#BigDataAnalytics
#BusinessIntelligence
#DataAnalyticsTechnology
#DataAndAnalytics