What is Cluster Analysis? And Why Use It?

2015-09-14 15_01_17-K-Means Clustering - Store. MicroStrategy 9

Why would you want to use cluster analysis on your retail sales data? Well, cluster analysis helps you identify non-independence in your data. Here is an example to help illustrate the point. Lets say we want to ask loads of teachers from many different schools what they think of their principal. If you ask two different teachers from two different schools, you will get two completely different answers that will be independent. But, if you ask two teachers from the same school, the answers will not be completely independent and could be very similar – but not EXACTLY the same.  Now if your job was to take the raw data and try to predict which school each teacher came from based on their answer – then you have an application of clustering.

2015-09-15 09_53_10-K-Means Clustering - Store - Original. MicroStrategy 9

The same thing can be applied to Walmart store performance for a supplier. You have some data points for a store like how long that store has been open, how many competitors it has located in its vicinity, what was your products sales performance for that store, some demographics for that area like unemployment and population, possibly even some historic weather data. Now you use a clustering algorithm to group your stores that are most closely related. This could be the first step in identifying under performing stores and why. It could give you a viable store list for a product test based on more than sales performance. It might help you further identify your product identity and who your actual customers are using enough demographic data. You might not find anything you didn’t already know. The important thing is that you are diving into your data to truly understand it on a level you never have before, and uncovering one of these nuggets could be millions of dollars difference to your company.

Once you’ve built your base analysis, and in our case we built our report that you see above, turned it into an in-memory cube, and then built a MicroStrategy dashboard on top of it – we can then explore slicing and dicing our data along the different data points to help identify if any of the metrics in our analysis are a key contributor to a cluster alignment. This way we can determine what factor affects sales the most. Could it be store age? or store square footage? or unemployment? Ethnic breakdown? What of these are driving markdowns?

The great thing about using this analysis as a MicroStrategy dashboard is that it is pretty easy to tweak to look for your top performing stores, and refreshing the data source is very easy. In fact, this report could be automated each week and emailed to you. There might even be an application to look for cluster changes and have something like that generate an alert so you only need to be bothered if anything changes.

Contact us today to discover how Vortisieze analytics can help you explore your own data science.

#PredictiveAnalytics market will be worth $5.24 billion by 2018 illuminated by new report

Interesting introductory article announcing a predictive analytics report.

The report “Predictive Analytics Market [(Fraud, Risk, Marketing, Operations), Verticals (BFSI, Healthcare, Environment, Government, Retail, Energy, Manufacturing, Transportation, Travel, Telecom, Sports)]: Worldwide Market Forecasts and Analysis (2013 – 2018)”, defines and segments the predictive analytics software market into various sub-segments with in-depth analysis and forecasting of revenues. It also identifies drivers and restraints for this market with insights on trends, opportunities, and challenges.

Global predictive analytics market is driving on the emergence of massive amount of data deluge and innovative technology implementations. Business enterprises focus has changed from traditional Business Intelligence (BI) solutions to predictive analytics, because they have understood the importance of data and its analysis for the future estimation.

Traditional BI solutions are striving to sustain in this highly competitive world. The transformation of BI to predictive analytics gives new opportunities to the big players as well as new startups in this market.

This article highlights the how big data is outpacing traditional BI – both in ability to deliver actionable insights and the technological infrastructure to handle massive amounts of data, much of which is ad hoc and unstructured.

For a complimentary consultations about your analytics and insights needs contact us today.

Source:  Predictive analytics market will be worth $5.24 billion by 2018 illuminated by new report

#PredictiveAnalytics
#DataAndMarketing
#BigData
#CPG
#CPGMarketing

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Retailers to increase IoT spend fourfold by 2020 to US$2.5bn | #BigData #TechnologyTrendsInRetail

Anticipating the winds of change, major retailers are expected to increase their investment in internet of things (IoT) technology fourfold to US$2.5bn by 2020.

In the commercial space, IoT in retail is one of the clearest examples where connected network technology could have a significant impact on customer interaction in stores.

In particular, retailers have already begun investing in IoT hardware, including Bluetooth beacons and radio frequency ID (RFID) tags that allow them to send information to them in-store and keep a tab on stock and price levels, respectively.
Read more . . .

How will your DSR handle all that new, differently structured data? (Hint – it won’t!)
Contact us today to discover how Vortisieze analytics can bring this, and many more, types of data to your analytics package.

Source: Retailers to increase IoT spend fourfold by 2020 to US$2.5bn

#BigData
#CPG
#CPGMarketing

#TechnologyInRetailIndustry

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Here Are the #CPG Brands Men and Women Trust Most | What Can #CPGMarketers Learn?

Interesting read.

Results are based on a survey of nearly 89,000 U.S. consumers age 15 and older in June and July of this year. Each respondent rated 40 randomly selected brands, and each brand received about 1,000 ratings. (A few months ago, Harris Poll released research about non-CPG products and services. In that study, top brands included Subway—before the revelations about pitchman Jared Fogle—and Target, despite the company’s high-profile data breach in 2013.)
Overlaps on the CPG lists underscore a key societal insight: Some responsibilities and activities, and the products associated with them, are no longer viewed as mainly the domain of one gender or another.
“Family backyard barbecues [Reynolds] and family bumps and scrapes [Band-Aid, Neosporin] are becoming gender-neutral domains,” de Vere said. “If I were a brand manager or advertising executive, I would be really intrigued to understand whether or not men and women see different benefits in some of these overlapping brands.”
Marketers should keep in mind that “brand choice for both men and women is emotional and rational,” he said, and strive to understand consumer motivation on both levels as they construct campaigns.

Top-10 Most Trusted CPG Brands for Men

  1. Band-Aid Adhesive Bandages
  2. Heinz Ketchup
  3. Neosporin Antiseptic
  4. Reynolds Aluminum Foil
  5. Duracell Batteries
  6. Ticonderoga Pencils
  7. Glenlivet Single Malt Scotch Whisky
  8. Energizer Batteries
  9. Ghirardelli Chocolate
  10. Scotch Tape

Top-10 Most Trusted CPG Brands for Women

  1. Ziploc Food Storage Bags
  2. Band-Aid Adhesive Bandages
  3. Reynolds Aluminum Foil
  4. Neosporin Antiseptic
  5. Dawn Dish Soap
  6. Kleenex Facial Tissues
  7. Sharpie Markers
  8. Q-Tips
  9. Clorox Bleach
  10. Tide Laundry Detergent

What can CPG marketers learn from this?  This data could be useful overlaid with other data in a big data analytics tool.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation.

 

Source:  Here Are the CPG Brands Men and Women Trust Most

#BigData
#BigDataAnalytics
#CategoryManagers
#CPG
#CPGMarketing

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Exploring #BigData Business Models & The Winning Value Propositions Behind Them | #CPGMarketing

This article, by Justin Lokitz – a thought leader in big data, provides an excellent overview of three distinct business models using big data.  Any one of which, or a hybrid, can be incorporated in a CPG category manager’s analytics process.  The article is worth a separate read but the main points are summarized, and applied to CPG, below:

It goes without saying, innovative, sustainable Big Data Business Models are as pervasive and sought after as they are elusive (i.e.  “data is the new oil”).  For every startup that designs and implements what amounts to a devilishly simple and effective big data business model (see any social network), perhaps changing the entire landscape with it, there are literally hundreds (if not thousands) of larger, more mature companies looking for ways to monetize their own big data in the hope that they can capture new revenue streams (and compete effectively in the future).  Of course some of the larger, mature companies have done quite well in this regard.  Apple (40 years old) and Amazon (20 years old), for instance, have vastly different business models.  Yet, both companies have built solid business models around big data; both use big data to present to consumers products and services that might be relevant to them.  Similarly, Netflix and Pandora, 18 and 15 years old respectively, designed brand new big data business models around understanding and creating value for customers in ways that seemed like magic at the time.  So, what’s behind these business models?  And, are there other business models that might help other (mature) companies create, deliver, and capture value using big data at the core?  The answer (to both questions) is simple: it’s all in the value proposition.

He further states in his introduction:

“Fall in Love with the Problem, Not the Solution.” As simple as this quote is it speaks volumes when considering how mature companies tend to think about utilizing their own big data stores to create new business models.  That is to say most mature companies first ask, “What big data do we have today?” followed by, “how might we sell this data?” Looking back on my favorite aforementioned quote, you can probably see the discrepancy here: most mature companies believe there is some mythical marketplace where they can simultaneously sell their big data whilst not pissing off their customers.  These assumptions are more often than not wrong.  Moreover, while there are LOTS of “problems” to fall in love with when it comes to big data business models, in order to provide some focus, this post highlights three categories of big data business models based on their value propositions and customers (e.g.  DaaS, IaaS, and AaaS respectively).

Big-Data-Pyramid

  • Data as a Service (DaaS)

DaaS hinges on a value proposition for supplying large amounts of processed data with the idea that the customer’s job-to-be-done is to find answers or develop solutions for their customers.

For CPG companies partnering with large retailers as a trusted supplier – this usually begins with the POS/Inventory data supplied at the vendor level or, where appropriate, the category level.

The granularity of data can be daily or weekly and provide historical data – usually 104 weeks.  While the author speaks in general terms about marketing data to monetize it (in fact the entire article has an eye toward this), CPG companies cannot sell retailer supplied data.  This does not mean that you, as a CPG category or sales manager cannot monetize the data.  For you – monetization occurs when you use analytics to gain insights to share with your buyer(s).  The goal of this activity, of course, is to flank your competitors within the category, increasing your brand’s market share within the retailer ecosystem.

Part of the Vortisieze service offering is providing a fast, clean, single source of the truth, aggregated data and the analytics tools to empower you to produce your own insights.

data-as-a-service

  • Information as a Service (IaaS)

IaaS focuses on providing insights based on the analysis of processed data.  In this case the customer’s job-to-be-done is more about coming up with their own conclusions or even “selling” an idea based on certain information.  Additionally, IaaS customers don’t want to or do not have the resources to process and analyze data.  Rather they are willing to exchange value for analysis from trusted parties.  Unlike the DaaS business model, which is about aggregation and dissemination of lots of processed data for customers to create their own value propositions from, the IaaS business model is all about turning data into information for customers who need something – and are willing to pay for something – more tailored.

Because we have category manager DNA in our company’s DNA, Vortisieze can meet this need by providing ready-to-use analytics, dashboards such as Business at a Glance (BaaG) for example.

information-as-a-service

  • Answers as a Service (AaaS)

AaaS is focused on providing higher-level answers to specific questions rather than simply the information that can be used to come up with an answer.  CPG companies who implement the AaaS business model do so in gain answers to answer specific questions.

This business model, as you might guess, is the top of the pyramid when it comes big data.  The key with this business model is that given the CPG company’s ability to create real, trusted value in the answers it provides to buyers, buyers take note and value the insightful answers provided.

When a category manager partners with Vortisieze by asking very specific questions needing answers (remember strategy drives questions), we can provide answers to your most important questions.

answers-as-a-service

 

Vortisieze technology, unlike rigid DSRs or yesteryear, provides pliable, and rapid, solutions to meet your analytics needs.

Contact us today to discover how.

 

About the article author:

Justin Lokitz is Strategy Designer & Managing Director at Business Models Inc.  San Francisco

Source:  Exploring Big Data Business Models & The Winning Value Propositions Behind Them

 

#BigData
#BigDataAnalytics
#CategoryManagers
#CPG
#CPGMarketing
#DataasaService
#InformationasaService
#AnswersasaService

 

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#BigData: Too Many Answers, Not Enough Questions – What Questions Are #CPG #CategoryManagers Asking?

This article on Forbes.com today nicely points out one potential issue with Big Data – data on its own is meaningless.    The author starts off with a useful parable that illustrates the point.

One of my favorite examples of why so many big data projects fail comes from a book that was written decades before “big data” was even conceived. In Douglas Adams’ The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, a race of creatures build a supercomputer to calculate the meaning of “life, the universe, and everything.” After hundreds of years of processing, the computer announces that the answer is “42.” When the beings protest, the computer calmly suggests that now they have the answer, they need to know what the actual question is — a task that requires a much bigger and more sophisticated computer.

Data is only useful when it answers questions that drive or support your brand strategy at the retailer level.  Knowing your strategy is key – once that is well understood coming up with the right questions is straightforward.  As Yogi Berra once said, as only Yogi could, “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.

So, what questions do you as a CPG Category Manager, or Sales Manager, need to ask to drive your brand strategy?

Reply below with your pressing questions that aren’t, currently, being answered by your DSR and analytics package.

Remember – you can always contact us to discuss ways that Vortisieze will get you to the answers you need.

 

Source: Big Data: Too Many Answers, Not Enough Questions

 

#BigData
#CPG
#CategoryManager

 

 

 

 

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#CPG #CategoryManagers Take Note:  Smile, You’re on Consumer Camera

We’ve noted recently how beacon technology can track a consumer’s movement throughout the store and broadcast product specific marketing to the consumer using their smart phone.

Additionally, there is new technology that can use the existing security cameras and floor tiles to both watch movement and track traffic location throughout the store.

Of course this depends on the retailer investing in this technology, over which you as a CPG category manager or sales manager have no control.

But something you do control, or at least influence, is how, or if, you can analyze the resulting data once it becomes available.  Older DSR technologies, using database or data warehouse methods, are rigid and hard to change.  Adding new data streams takes months or years to incorporate – if attempted faster can break the data model making is difficult to load or extract data.  Difficult means time consuming.  Not what you need when your buyer’s meeting is 9am Monday and you are waiting on data loading (called ETL) and extraction (reporting) at 10pm Sunday night.

Big data is different – not just the buzz around it – but truly different from a technological point of view.

Big data allows you to add new, even unstructured data (think your latest spreadsheet creation), for analytics insights in hours or days.  So when this new consumer tracking data is made available to you analyzing and acting on it means you can take steps toward better promotions and product launches.

Big data technology is demonstrably faster in loading (literally minutes versus hours) and extraction and reporting.

Which would you rather do on Sunday night – sit at the office until midnight just waiting on your first peak at last week’s data – or home with your family watching Sunday Night Football?

Vortisieze is the first big data analytics package designed exclusively for the CPG community.

Contact us today and makes us prove just how fast Vortisieze can put you ahead of your competition.

 

 

Source:  Smile, You’re on Consumer Camera

 

#AnalyticsInRetail

#CPG

#CPGMarketing

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ZuumSocial Releases Facebook Leaderboard – Most Engaged #CPG Brands on FB

Last month Zuum announced it will begin monthly ranking of the 25 most engaging brands on Facebook.  The rankings are limited to the top brands operating in the U.S.  This is how they summarized their criteria for selection:

The goal of this is to capture the Facebook content and community traits of the top brands operating in the US. So we’ve put several constraints on which brands are selected. Brands must be operating in the US, we’ll use the US page unless there’s only a global page, brands must be consumer products vs B2B, and we’re excluding technology and entertainment brands, as our goal is to better understand how typical consumer products work on social media, and both of those categories tend to skew towards extremely high engagement due to the product type.

For July and August Monster Energy Drinks captured the top.  This month Zuum has released the rankings for a specific category CPG Dips and Dressings.  Here is the lead-in to their rankings:

CPG is a very broad business category, with sub-categories like soft drinks having brands with some of the larger social media fan counts anywhere. In our July ranking of the 25 most engaging brands on Facebook, the three top brands are CPG.

Of course, the CPG umbrella includes many smaller brands, with more niche or regional appeal. One subcategory in particular is dips and dressings. Below is the Facebook Leaderboard for some of the top dips and spreads brands in the US for the month of July.

You can see that the fan counts, while not what you’ll see from Pepsi or Coke, are still substantial. Posting volume is a little light in this category, with even the top brand, Sabra, only posting about 1 time per day.

Once the novelty of these new rankings are gone what value does this have to a CPG category manager or sales analyst?  “Well – Nancy . . .” – if your analytics cannot lay this new, unstructured data alongside your retailer supplied POS and inventory data – there is no value outside of water cooler talk.

This is one of the major limitations of rigid, outdated, DSRs built using data warehouse technology.  Rigid in the sense that to add new data feeds takes months – sometimes years.  The loading of the data – including current feeds – is long and cumbersome.  From a technological point-of-view these simply will break under the weight of increasing amount and type of data.

If you want to use these new – and exciting – data points (social media, weather, and et. al.) to draw insights and correlations to sales – then the only technology that can pull this off – today – is Big Data.

That’s what the buzz is about.  Will your brand be buzzing going forward?

We are Vortisieze.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on your BI strategy.

 

Sources:

Facebook July Leaderboard for CPG Dips and Dressings

http://blogs.imediaconnection.com/blog/2015/08/17/facebook-july-leaderboard-for-cpg-dips-and-dressings/

 

Ranking 25 of the most engaging brands on Facebook

http://zuumsocial.com/ranking-25-of-the-most-engaging-brands-on-facebook/

 

July Ranking of 25 Most Engaging Brands on Facebook

http://zuumsocial.com/july-ranking-of-25-most-engaging-brands-on-facebook/

 

#CPG

#Business Intelligence

#BigData

#AnalyticsInRetail

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Top 3 Nuggets Buried In Your Retail Transaction Data

  1. What is selling – and where:  With POS data available daily waiting once a week to adjust store inventory is over.  Immediate shelf adjustments puts the right product in the right place.
  2. Customer buying patterns:  Patterns emerge from data about customer behavior and CPG companies can meet consumer needs before the consumer is aware of those needs.
  3. Is your data clean?:  Pulling in structured data into rigidly structured DSR data warehouses is fairly straight forward.  The retailer and CPG firm share and use the same definition for key retail elements.  But as CPG adopts big data technology that allows ad hoc, sometimes unstructured data to become part of the analytics pool, CPG may find that the category managers and home office are using different definitions for sale, customer, etc.  With flexibility comes responsibility – the responsibility of creating a single definition for common retail elements.  Big data allows CPG the flexibility to do this.

To summarize – many nuggets can be mined from the transactional data received from the retailer.  But it is increasingly critical that this data is brought in and analyzed much faster than before.  Big, rigid data warehouses bog down loading increasing volumes of data making it more difficult for CPG category managers, supply chain and manufacturing to respond quickly to changing consumer buying behavior.  Big data, by design, can reduce this process from many hours to mere minutes.

To understand how fast analytical insights can help you gain that competitive advantage for your brand contact us today for a complementary consultation.  (We won’t tell your IT director if you don’t.)

 

 

Source:  Consumer-packaged goods sector digs into transaction data

#CPG

#CPGMarketing

#CPGCategoryManagement

#CPGSupplyChain

 

 

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Lessons #CPG Companies Can Take From The 2015 #BackToSchool Campaign

Recent, well respected, retail analysis reports focused on back-to-school campaigns, the second busiest retail period of the year, shows new and emerging trends in customer shopping behavior. These trends will certainly change how retailers approach this sales period.

Some very interesting trends have surfaced and we’ll look at a few below that are gleaned from the annual Deloitte “Back-to-School” survey.

What lessons can CPG brand marketers learn from emerging customer shopping behaviors and expectations? Many, to be sure, so let’s take a look at the trends that can also impact CPG going forward.

  • Shoppers who are mobile savvy may be doing more research on the beach before hitting the stores.
  • Consumers are no longer exclusively driven by discounts.
  • Consumers will be “mission-driven” and making most of the purchasing decisions prior to the store, with digital devices in greater play.
  • This year shows a 6-percent jump in smartphone owners using devices for shopping, with 80 percent of shoppers taking that approach.
  • More than half, 51 percent, of shoppers are not familiar with in-store beacon technology, and 32 percent said they had no plans to use it.

What jumps out of this survey how the use of technology, especially mobile, in shopping is becoming the norm. 80% of shoppers using mobile devices for shopping will only increase as Millennials marry and begin having children.

As retailers continue to adopt technology to market to the individual shopper (e.g. beacon technology) new streams of data are now available to analyze by CPG brands for shaping marketing campaigns. This new data breaks the existing DSRs that many CPG companies use to analyze retail data. It takes, literally, months or years to incorporate new data sets into a rigid DSR data warehouse.

Big data thrives on new, different and unstructured data – because of its design. That’s why Big Data is such a Big Deal in CPG marketing.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how big data can become your big deal.

 

Source: Back-to-School: Reports reveal what’s hot, what’s not and consumer trends

 

#RetailCustomerAnalytics

#CPG

#CPGMarketing